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Filed under
Jack Warren Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

Kay Levie has loved photography since she was old enough to hold a camera.
She says that was a long time ago. Her first camera was a Kodak Brownie Box
Camera. She stated it was very limiting to use and challenging to capture images
it wasn't made to capture - like cats jumping in the air or horses running.
It taught her a lot about timing, which is what sports photography is all about.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 29, 2005 0 comments

One of the reasons that many people are getting into making prints at home
these days is that inkjet prints are simpler to make and more permanent than,
in many cases, photographic prints (dye based projection, that is.) With recent
advances in ink and paper technology from companies such as Epson and HP we
now see the potential, given proper storage, of digital prints lasting more
than 100 years. Even snapshot size prints, according to Wilhelm Research, from
portable printers like the popular and relatively diminutive PictureMate from
Epson can last three generations or more. And most of the newer printers don't
even require the intermediary of the computer to make very good looking prints.

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Filed under
Jack Warren Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

Drew Hallowell and travel partner, Hunter Martin, are photographers for the
Philadelphia Eagles. Mentors of Ed Mahan, long time Eagles photographer, they
are the young shooters on their way up with the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFL
photographic arena.

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 15, 2005 0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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Filed under
Jack Warren Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Henry Diltz is a photographer who made his living first as musician with Modern
Folk Quartet (MFQ), then as a trusted friend and photographer of many successful
groups from that time forward. The Lovin Spoon Full, The Mama's and Papa's,
Crosby Stills and Nash, The Doors and many more. He bought his first camera
a Kodak "Pony", while on tour with his group. They had a photo shoot
out with slide film and when they got home they shared them with each other
in a slide show. That was enough to hook Henry on photography forever.



Photos © Henry Diltz, All Rights Reserved

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

There are times when we have images that are too dark or too light and often
reject them out of hand. But the values only need to be adjusted to bring what
might have sat in shadow into the light. We can do that selectively with certain
tonal areas in the print or globally--that is, on the entire image. This
web how-to covers revealing what might sit in the shadows and deals with a very
simple global adjustment. The work is done here in Photoshop, but many other
image manipulation programs have similar controls.

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Feb 15, 2005 0 comments

Handcolorists have been doing it for years. They began with a black and white
image and using photo oils, chiefly from the Marshall Company (distributed by
BKA Group) added selective color or entirely covered a monochrome image with
color. This was often practiced with portraits, but began to find followers
in the "fine arts" arena as well. We've seen this so-called
mixed-media trend come and go, and I don't think hand-coloring will ever
go out of style. Digital has opened up many new doors for creativity, and because
you can manipulate images with ease it allows you to emulate any look, style
or technique that you might admire. In this lesson we'll take a look at
"colorizing" an image and mixing color with black and white.

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jan 18, 2005 0 comments

There are times when you want your color to exactly match what's in the
scene, but for the most part color is a fairly subjective matter that can be
tweaked with ease in just about any image-editing program. Color has a hue--like
yellow, green or blue--as well as a vividness, which in photography is
often called its saturation. In addition, color can have a cast, which is influenced
by the prevailing lighting conditions when we make the photograph. That cast
can be influenced by the light source itself, such as photographing under direct
sun versus what we'd get when photographing under tungsten lights, and
by the position of the subject in relation to that light source, such as the
difference between photographing in the shade or open light. In addition, color
can also be influenced by the recording medium itself, be it film or digital,
and how the film is made or the digital image processor is programmed to change
the color during the recording processing.

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Filed under
Jack Warren Posted: Jan 18, 2005 0 comments

Every Friday high profile photographers come to the microphones of wsRadio.com
the world wide leader in Internet talk, the best, brightest and high profile
photographers in the world for your listening pleasure.


We are approaching three years of Internet Radio broadcasting. What makes this
show different from other radio shows is that it originates and is stored on
the web at www.shutterbugradio.com
or www.wsradio.com/shutterbug.
The content of the show is all photography talk, all the time. If you missed
hearing something important, you can go back and replay it again and again.
If you're a photo enthusiast you'll love to here high profile photographers
share their exciting experiences while giving hints and tips on how they get
the job done. Find out what kind of equipment they use and what they recommend.



You will also hear industry leaders make important major announcements that
will affect your photography. You will find out about major trade shows in the
industry.



What does it feel like flying in the chase plane of space Ship One, photographing
one of the historical events of your lifetime. How do you hold your breath when
the horses of the Kentucky Derby are coming around the final turn and you alone
are responsible to record this spectacular moment? Do you know what kind of
camera Oscar nominated Jeff Bridges prefers? Do you know how many photographers
cover the Indy 500? What is it like being a photographer in the NFL? You just
have to listen to this outstanding broadcast each week and hear the voices of
these very talented photographers.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jan 04, 2005 0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 21, 2004 0 comments

There are many ways to work with monochrome images, including selective adjustment
of tonal values, contrast and even image color that can emulate toning. In this
installment of our Web How To's we'll play with colorization, adding
color to selective parts of a monochrome image that can make it look like a
combination hand-painted (with photo oils) and toned photograph. You can paint
in selectively with brush tools if you like, but this how-to deals with a more
simplified approach.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 07, 2004 0 comments

Every month in Shutterbug we publish photographs from readers based on an assignment
published in a previous month's issue. We get hundreds of photographs
from readers all around the world and unfortunately we are limited to publishing
just a small fraction of the work we receive. We've had topics including
"Black and White in Color", "Silhouettes" and "Historical
Reenactments." Our purpose in creating this section in the magazine is
to create a visual forum for readers and to challenge them to fulfill assignments.
It's always a delight to open the packages we receive. I know the thrill
I got when my fist photo was published, and my hope is that the same excitement
is shared by those whose images we select to publish each month.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Nov 22, 2004 0 comments



Remember the shoebox, the place where all those snapshots were stored? It was
a great tradition to take a roll of film, share it with family and friends and
then dutifully deposit the pictures and negatives into a cardboard container that
would be stocked away on some closet shelf. Well, digital photography hasn't
changed that great tradition, but nowadays the "shoebox" is more likely
filled with CDs or DVDs that hold the pictures--only to be stacked away in that
same closet next to that snapshot shoebox.
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Nov 09, 2004 0 comments

While you can choose enhanced color saturation when using your digital camera
via the Menu, this choice generally adds saturation to all colors at once. This
might work fine for some subjects, but there are many ways to "juice up"
selective colors later in the software. We'll work with two controls here,
Hue/Saturation and Selective Color, both used as Adjustment Layers.


1

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Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Oct 26, 2004 0 comments

Scene modes are pre-programmed "suggestions" for setting up your digital camera for specific subjects. Many digital cameras have Scene modes located in their screen menus, while others have them on the command dial of the camera itself. Scene modes include Sports (also known as Action, for making pictures with as fast a shutter...

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