Lighting Equipment

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Ron Eggers Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

Wireless flash control is really big right now. For a long time, wireless systems primarily used slave triggering or infrared technology to fire strobes remotely. Increasingly, though, RF (Radio Frequency) systems are becoming the norm. RF systems, which generally provide multiple frequencies, make it possible to have a number of different photographers shooting with their own...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

One of the difficulties of getting involved in studio work is trying to figure out where to begin. There are so many different lighting systems and so many equipment options available that it's not easy to figure out what's essential, what might be nice to have, and what really isn't necessary, at least when you first begin. Just what type of lighting do you need...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Dec 01, 2006 0 comments

Electronic flash functionality continues to expand with one of the major innovations over the last few years being portability. For a long time the options were either using professional lighting gear in the studio, or using makeshift portable-powered lighting setups on location. Frequently, photographers would jerry-rig battery-powered auxiliary on-camera flash units to work with...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

The F.J. Westcott Co. recently expanded its Spiderlite line of lighting equipment with the introduction of a power pack as well as two self-contained strobe heads. Westcott has a wide selection of Spiderlite equipment, including various-sized softboxes, several different head types, stands, and both halogen and fluorescent bulb options.

The equipment is relatively...

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Ron Eggers and Stan Sholik Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Serious lighting equipment isn't just for high-paid commercial photographers anymore. There are a growing number of new, sophisticated, electronic lighting systems available that meet the needs and budgets of most serious photographers, including those who previously would never have considered acquiring professional-type flash systems.

One reason that...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

The Studio System Pro Starter Kit distributed by the Brandess-Kalt-Aetna (BKA) Group includes two components--a professional studio setup and a smaller, more portable unit. The first component is a good solution for experienced photographers who want to get more serious about studio lighting. It includes the SP Excalibur 3200 Monolight, a full-sized strobe head with...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Oct 01, 2006 0 comments

Manufacturers/Distributors

Argraph Corporation (Sunblitz)
111 Asia Pl.
Carlstadt, NJ 07072
(201) 939-7722
www.argraph.com

Nikon Inc.
1300 Walt Whitman Rd.
Melville, NY 11747
(800) 645-6687
http://www.nikonusa.com"...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2006 0 comments

The Travel-Pak battery is a take-anywhere power source that comes with a handy carrying handle and case with shoulder strap. Note the two outlets; both 500 ws heads or one at a time can be used.

The Gemini kit is composed of two flash heads (monoblocs), two heavy-duty 9-foot stands, two umbrella reflectors, two umbrellas, all cords, bulbs, and cables, as well as a...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

If there's one thing I learned from working on my latest book, Studio Lighting Solutions (Amphoto, 2005), there is a light specially suited to every subject and situation. Pro photographers find exactly what they need, and if it's not the exact solution, they fashion it to their needs with the addition of various accessories.

So when I entered the...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

When asked to do a report on the LiteShaper, I said, "Great." I'd seen the product mentioned in previous Shutterbug issues and it looked very interesting and unique. A box full of several LiteShaper panels and a couple of softboxes soon arrived on my doorstep. I worked with small- and medium-sized Chimera softboxes. After putting the boxes together and adding the...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

I'm not really fussy about my lights. By that, I mean I'm not enamored by a specific brand and I don't need them to measure light in hundredths of a stop. I also don't need them to cycle in half a second. If I were a fashion or commercial photographer, things might be different, but as a portrait guy, my needs are pretty simple.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

I 'm always looking for new solutions to light small things. Change that. I'm always looking for easier and faster solutions to light small things. Let's face it: lighting tabletops is never easy, although you'd think it should be. And sometimes, formulaic lighting is exactly what's needed. Then along comes the Gem eBox, from MK Digital Direct.

George Schaub Posted: Mar 22, 2005 Published: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

If you enjoy exploring the fascinating world of close-up photography you should consider a ring flash as an essential part of your creative kit. A ring flash mounts around your taking lens and eliminates problems associated with standard shoe-mount flash and even off-camera flash, mainly the inability to down-angle the...

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Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Riddle me this: What's the hardest thing to find on any location shoot? If you said, "clients who were on time," that would be partially true, but the correct answer is--an AC power outlet. They're even more difficult to find if you're at the beach, in a park, or as I often find myself, on a racetrack somewhere. One of the niftiest solutions...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

All Photos © 2004, Peter K. Burian, All Rights Reserved

"This excerpt was taken from Mastering Digital Photography and Imaging © 2003, SYBEX Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved."

Flash has come a long way from the old days when photographers were required to make complex calculations to get a good flash exposure. Almost all digital cameras...

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