Accessories

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

Delkin's FireWire 400/800 UDMA CompactFlash Reader
This Ultra Direct Memory Access reader is a one-slot external device that offers a data transfer speed of over 45MB/s, is PC and Mac compatible, and doesn't require a driver. It supports CompactFlash cards Types I and II, Microdrive, and UDMA-enabled cards. The reader comes with a FireWire 400 to...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2008 7 comments

I've been a long-time proponent of Canon Speedlites, and also an avid follower of Metz flashes. I always liked the Metz for its sturdy quality and reliability--I'd owned a Metz potato masher (handlemount, in the old vernacular). But when I switched to the Canon EOS system, I became a devout Canon shoe-mount advocate, finding these flashes dependable and robust. I...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Delkin's 305X UDMA CompactFlash PRO Cards
Delkin has released their 305X UDMA CompactFlash PRO cards and accessories. The cards feature high read/write speeds with a transfer capability of 45MB per second. The UDMA CompactFlash PRO cards are available in the following capacities: 1GB ($79.99), 2GB ($109.99), 4GB ($179.99), and 8GB ($299.99). Delkin also...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Ever since Foveon, Inc., based in Santa Clara, California, announced their unique new image sensor design back in 2001, it has been the subject of some controversy. Foveon's initial promotional campaign proclaimed the virtues of their invention in glowing terms while denigrating the competition, with the predictable result being a background level of skepticism that persists...

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George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Two things have changed in determining the best bag for lugging around gear while traveling by plane--the type of gear a photographer travels with and the airline restrictions on carryon gear. These days there seems to be a need for more space for accessories required than actual camera and lens, what with more and more photographers traveling with laptops, card readers...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

Granted, when hand holding my Canon EOS 5D D-SLR, I prefer to use the optical viewfinder for the utmost stability. But there are many times when I'd be just as happy to view the subject on the LCD--except, of course, that this camera, unlike newer models, lacks a live view display.

Well, I've found just the device that gives my 5D that capability...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

How can you make the most use out of that limited quantity of memory cards when on the road, especially on a long trip? The answer: a portable drive. When connected to a host computer via USB 2.0, all these devices are recognized as an external drive--but not immediately in some cases: it may require activation of a USB function on the device. Adding to the utility of many of...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

CineBags' CB-22 HD Backpack LT
HD Backpacks are designed to accommodate medium-sized digital video cameras or similar sized photographic equipment and a laptop computer. The bag features padded customizable interior compartments, a laptop compartment, a padded shoulder harness, organizer pockets, a tripod strap, and an exterior bottle holder. HD...

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George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Billed as a "large wheeled camera/computer case," the Pelican 283 (for short) can carry all your gear, and more, in a clever design that holds more than you could imagine in a carryon, wheeled case. In truth, when the entire bag is "together," it can be difficult to stow into an above-seat bin, my main criteria for a bag these days, and in fact the case is...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Remember the old Kodak 18 percent Gray Card that we used as a neutral target to determine exposure, without undue influence from bright and dark tones? I still have a bunch of those lying around. There were several problems with the card; holding it the wrong way might cause a glaring hot spot. Second, it was cardboard, not built to last. Third, it didn't travel...

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C.A. Boylan Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

Decorative Tuscan Columns
Meese Orbitron Dunne Co. has a new addition to their Tuscan Colonnade Arch System. Crafted from durable, weatherproof, and lightweight polyethylene, these architectural-style columns are ideal for photographers and wedding planners. The system includes two 6-foot and two 21/2-foot tall columns, available in white or a choice of...

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Steve Anchell Posted: Oct 01, 2007 1 comments

Recently, I had an assignment to photograph food for publication. It was to be photographed at the home of the writer. Not knowing what to expect I arrived with a carload of strobes, Photoflex light modifiers, Avenger light stands, and various sizes of white and black foamcore to reflect and block light. The food was laid out on a table under a large chandelier. I took one look...

C.A. Boylan Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Savage Universal's Light Kits
Savage Universal has added two new light kits to their line of photographic equipment. The M31500 and M31100 kits include three variable power light heads with a quartz light bulb in each, three 24x24" softboxes, three four-section stands, and three 10-foot AC power cords with a carrying case. The kits are designed...

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Ron Eggers and Stan Sholik Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Newer digital cameras have become so good at taking light measurements that some photographers might question the need for handheld meters. It may seem that the sophisticated multi-segment metering systems, the advanced light measurement capabilities, and the ways these cameras are able to work with different light sources with different color temperatures are making handheld...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

There are two real reasons to use a flash bracket. The first is to raise the flash high enough above the lens so that shadows just drop behind the subject instead of off to one side. When keeping a suitable distance from the background, the shadow will usually just disappear. The second is to eliminate the dreaded "redeye" caused by the flash being too close to the...

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